Contemporary unionism in the United States.
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Contemporary unionism in the United States. by Clyde Edward Dankert

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Published by Prentice-Hall in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Labor unions -- United States

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliographical footnotes.

SeriesThe Prentice-Hall industrial relations and personnel series
The Physical Object
Paginationxv, 521 p. diagrs.
Number of Pages521
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14889584M

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The book Transformations of Trade Unionism is a historical analysis of the development of the labour movement in European countries and in the United States, covering case studies on unions during the eighteenth century through to their recent developments in the late s. Labor unions in the United States are organizations that represent workers in many industries recognized under US labor law. Their activity today centers on collective bargaining over wages, benefits, and working conditions for their membership, and on representing their members in disputes with management over violations of contract provisions. Larger trade unions also National organization(s): AFL-CIO, CtW, IWW. This book explores the political trajectory of Latin America's most important contemporary labor movement. The New Unionism played a central role in Brazil's struggle for democracy in the s and recast the country's subsequent party politics through its creation of the innovative Workers' Party (PT). First published in , this volume discusses the conditions for contemporary and future unionism in the light of recent economic, political and managerial changes. It presents theoretical and empirical research from Australia, Austria, Canada, Denmark, Italy, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Russia, South Africa, Sweden and the United States.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Green, William, Modern trade unionism. Washington, D.C.: American Federation of Labor, that unionism has made great gains and is beginning to challenge the dominance of our great corporations. But the unions have neither monopoly control over in-dustry nor the main say in public af-fairs in the contemporary United States. Unionism in this country is almost as old as is the nation. There were strikes and short-lived unions in the. Review of The Future of Private Sector Unionism in the United States., by James T. Bennett and Bruce E. Kaufman. Industrial & Labor Relations Review, Vol. 56, No. 4. The present History of Trade Unionism in the United States is in part a summary of work in labor history by Professor John R. Commons and collaborators at the University of Wisconsin from to , and in part an attempt by the author to carry the work further.

Tough Liberal: Albert Shanker and the Battles Over Schools, Unions, Race, and Democracy (Columbia Studies in Contemporary American History) [Richard D. Kahlenberg] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Tough Liberal: Albert Shanker and the Battles Over Schools, Unions, Race, and Democracy (Columbia Studies in Contemporary American History)Cited by: Rebuilding Labor begins with a comprehensive overview of recent union organizing in the United States; goes on to present a series of richly detailed case studies of such topics as union leadership, organizer recruitment and retention, union democracy, and the dynamics of anti-unionism among rank-and-file workers; and concludes with a /5(5).   Examines the history, contemporary practice, and policy issues of non-union employee representation in the U.S. and Canada. It encompasses many organizational devices, such as shop committees, works councils, employee teams, and joint industrial councils, that are organized on a nonunion basis for the purposes of representing employees on a wide range of . A History of Trade Unionism in the United States. by Selig Perlman. AUTHOR'S PREFACE. The present _History of Trade Unionism in the United States_ is in part a summary of work in labor history by Professor John R. Commons and collaborators at the University of Wisconsin from to , and in part an attempt by the author to carry the work further.